Tutorials

IEEE PES GM 2016 Tutorial Descriptions, Schedule, Pricing and Instructors

 

FULL-DAY TUTORIALS

HALF-DAY TUTORIALS

 

View full biographies for all Tutorial Instructors here.

 

Full-Day Tutorials

Demand Response Programs: Overview, Applications, Field Experiments, and Comparisons

Date:Sunday July 17, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Pengwei Du, Electric Reliability Council of Texas, Ning Lu, PNNL Farrokh Rahimi, OATI, Yonghong Chen, MISO, Jianming (Jamie) Lian, PNNL

With proliferation of renewable generation the fundamental operating principle of power systems is changing from "load following" to "Generation following." Current power grid operation predominantly relies on scheduling and regulating generation resources to supply loads and balance load changes. Increased variability of renewable generation resources results in the need for higher levels of balancing requirements. With the advancement of information technologies, power system end-use loads are becoming more agile and can participate in provision of balancing energy and other grid services. Demand response programs take advantage of the modern control, sensor, and communication technology to manage load for providing different grid services. This tutorial will focus on two parts of training materials: (i) demand response fundamentals and (ii) successful storied and lessons learnt in the DR demo and actual field implantation projects carried out in recent years. The goal is to explain the basic concepts of DR programs and share results and findings from on-going DR projects from different angles.

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Energy Forecasting in the Smart Grid Era

Date: Sunday July 17, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Tao Hong, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Shu Fan, Monash University, Hamidreza Zareipour, University of Calgary, Pierre Pinson, Technical University of Denmark

Wide range deployment of smart grid technologies enables utilities to monitor the power systems and gather data on a much more granular level than ever before. While the utilities can potentially better understand the customers, design the demand response programs, forecast and control the loads, integrate renewable energy and plan the systems, etc., they are facing analytic issues with making sense and taking advantage of the "big data."

This tutorial developed by IEEE Working Group on Energy Forecasting offers a comprehensive overview of energy forecasting to utility forecasters, analysts, planners, operators and their managers. The participants will learn the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of load, price and wind forecasting through real world examples and case studies. Topics include:

  • Fundamentals of energy forecasting
  • Short-term and long-term electricity demand forecasting
  • Price forecasting in competitive electricity markets
  • Wind power forecasting in theory and practice

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Energy Storage: An Introduction to Technologies, Applications and Best Practices

Date: Sunday July 17, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Dr. Hamid Zareipour, University of Calgary, Dr. Sudipta Lahiri, Distributed Energy Resources, DNV GL Energy, Dr. Michael Klinberg, Senior Consultant – Energy Advisory, DNV GL – Energy, Dr. Ramteen Sioshansi, the Ohio State University

Energy storage is becoming an attracting solution for today's smart grid, either being operated independently as asset or interacting with other resources like wind/solar generation or demand response. This tutorial will provide participants a solid understanding on the basics and the state-of-the-art energy storage application, its implications on the grid's reliability and the system's economics and how-to on evaluating its performance and cost-benefit. Instructors with diverse background on this subject will bring the field deployment experience of energy storage applications and the real-world example to demonstrate the analytic tools in assisting the utility planning and operation decisions. The course is suitable for non-technical, as well as technical audiences, including regulatory, legislative, and utility staff members.

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Planning and Integration of Flexible HVDC into Today's Grid

Date: Sunday July 17, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Michael I. Henderson, NE ISO, Prof. Dr. Rajiv Varma, UWO, Prof. Dr. Dirk Van Hertem, KU Leuven, Dr. Simon Teeuwsen, Siemens PTI, Dr. Stefanie Kuenzel, Imperial College London, Dr. Bernd Klöckl, Tennet, Dale Osborn, MISO, Prof Dr. Kyeon Hur, Yonsei University

The evolving planning process requires competitively solicited projects that efficiently and creatively use limited rights-of-way. In addition, renewable resources from remote locations must be successfully integrated with the system. High voltage direct current (HVDC) provides a viable option to transfer large amounts of power across long distances in an environmentally friendly manner.

This tutorial provides system planners with an understanding of how HVDC applications can reliably and economically improve the system. The tutorial reviews the planning process and discusses the studies necessary for considering HVDC technologies. Attendees will understand: the role of HVDC in the grid of the future; a planner’s perspective of basic HVDC technologies; and the technical issues that must be properly considered and addressed to successfully plan, implement, and operate an HVDC project. System interactions of new HVDC assets with the existing AC transmission system are specifically addressed. Case studies of HVDC plans providing reliable and economic service are presented as well as the how and why HVDC overlay networks can be successfully planned. The advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art HVDC technologies are discussed.

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Microgrids: Overview, Design, Analysis, Operation, Control, and Applications

Date: Tuesday July 19, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Claudio Canizares, University of Waterloo, Lingling Fan, University of South Florida, Josep M. Guerrero, Aalborg University, Nikos Hatziargyriou, National Technical University of Athens, Daniel Olivares, Pontifical University of Chile, Santiago, Rodrigo Palma, University of Chile, Jim Reilly, Reilly Associate

Isolated microgrids have been for decades the prevalent systems supplying electricity to customers in remote and island communities. More recently, these local grids are being considered for and deployed at many grid-connected locations, such as industrial plants, buildings and institutional campuses, and are rapidly becoming an integral part of power networks, since these networks facilitate the integration of distributed generation, particularly renewable resources, and increase system reliability and resiliency. Therefore, there is significant interest in the power and energy community in the development and utilization of these grids.

This tutorial will provide a complete overview of microgrids, from basic definitions, and components, to their design, operation, control and applications. Recognized experts will first discuss the characteristics and main components of various types of microgrids, as well as the motivations and objectives for their deployment. Various aspects of microgrid planning, including location and sizing, will also be presented, followed by detailed discussions of operational and control aspects, in particular energy management systems for active and reactive power dispatch, as well as various aspects of voltage and frequency stability and control. Finally, several actual examples of deployments and applications of isolated and grid connected microgrids will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on grid interactions.

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SCADA – From Fundamentals to Advanced Applications

Date: Tuesday July 19, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: John McDonald, GE Digital Energy, Mike Thesing, Patterson & Dewar Engineers, Inc

This course provides a comprehensive examination of electric utility supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems as well as the many adjacent technologies, techniques, and industry best practices that accompany them. Key topics to be covered include: SCADA system benefits, building blocks, and case studies; introduction to and comparison of communication technologies, protocols, and system uses; distribution automation and management systems; advanced applications and integration with other systems such as OMS and AMI; different types of SCADA architectures; and cyber security best practices. A student new to SCADA will leave with a thorough understanding of why these systems are so important to reliable grid operation and what steps are required for effective deployment. A veteran SCADA user will be able to fill in knowledge gaps and gain new ideas for improvements and upgrades. The presenters have over 60 years combined experience in this area so the talk will include many "real world" equipment and project examples to go along with the technology narrative. In addition, a complimentary copy of the new book Power System SCADA and Smart Grids, by Dr. Mini S. Thomas and John D. McDonald (CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, 2015), will be given to one of the students. Mike Thesing was one of the book reviewers (his comments are on the back cover of the book).

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Use of Synchrophasors in Grid Operations – From Oscillation Source Detection to Other Use Cases

Date: Tuesday July 19, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Qiang "Frankie" Zhang, ISO New England, Dan Trudnowski, Montana Tech, Kai Sun, University of Tennessee, Mani Venkatasubramanian, Washington State University, Lei Chen, Tsinghua University, Douglas Wilson, Psymetrix-ALSTOM, Slava Maslennikov, ISO New England, Kevin D. Jones, Dominion, Sarma Nuthalapati, ERCOT, Bill Blevins, ERCOT, Dmitry Kosterev, Bonneville Power Administration, Tim Bradberry, Duke Energy, John Pierre, University of Wyoming, Austin White, Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co

This two-part tutorial takes a progressive approach to introducing the use of synchrophasors in the daily power system operations. First part will demonstrate the path from research to operations through a specific use case – oscillation source detection and forced oscillations. Second part will give the audience a bigger picture by introducing more use cases and sharing experiences in various implementations.

Oscillation Monitor, as one of the most successful applications of the synchrophasor technology, has discovered many "new" oscillatory behaviors that could not be reproduced by model based analyses. Among them, forced oscillations are the most common ones. This tutorial will define forced and natural oscillations, present source detection methods and discuss practical issues when integrating it into operating procedures. After the oscillation source example, more use cases and integration/operational experiences of using synchrophasors in managing the grid will be presented in this tutorial. The audience will learn the real problems faced by the utilities, practical considerations in integration, and values that the synchrophasor technology can bring.

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Distribution Volt-var Control and Optimization

Date: Wednesday July 20, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Murty V.V.S. Yalla, Beckwith Electric Co Inc., Bob Uluski, Utility Integration Solutions, Mike Simms, Duke Energy, Valentina Dabic, B.C. Hydro, Larry Conrad, Conrad Technical Services, Mesut Baran, North Carolina State University, Barry Stephens, Georgia Power, Phil Powell, Dominion Voltage Inc., Borka Milosevic, GE Energy

The concept of Volt-var control is essential to electric power companies’ ability to deliver power within appropriate voltage limits (regulated by Public Utility Commissions) so that consumers’ equipment operates properly, and to deliver power at an optimal power factor to minimize distribution losses. The relationship between voltage and vars vary depending on the type of load (constant power, constant current, constant impedance), and the type, size, and location of distributed energy resources (photovoltaic, distributed wind, various storage technologies, etc.); among others. The complexity and dynamic nature of these characteristics make the task of managing electrical distribution networks challenging.

The smart grid concept has dramatically changed the design and operation of modern Volt-var control systems. The objectives for Volt-var Control have expanded considerably beyond simply maintaining acceptable voltage and power factor. "Volt-var Control" has become "Volt-var Optimization", which has the expanded objectives to increase overall efficiency, reduce electrical demand using conservation voltage reduction (CVR), promote energy conservation, and improve power quality.

Volt-var Optimization (VVO) systems must accommodate distributed energy resources (DERs), and must respond automatically when the status or output level of DERs changes. In addition, VVO systems must operate effectively following feeder reconfiguration, which will happen more frequently in a smart distribution grid due to optimal network reconfiguration, automatic service restoration, and other applications involving "smart" switching.

This tutorial will cover Volt-var control basic principles, terms and definitions, approaches, issues and challenges, and results observed. This course also presents case studies from GA power, BC Hydro and Duke Energy. This course will benefit engineers in operations, planning, smart grid, SCADA groups. It will be especially useful for utilities who are contemplating implementing Volt-var Optimization.

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Power System State Estimation

Date: Wednesday July 20, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Ali Abur, Professor at Northeastern, Kevin Clements, Professor at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Antonio G. Exposito, Professor at the University of Seville, Lamine Mili, Professor at Virginia Tech, Robson Pires, Professor at the Federal University of Itajuba, Adrien Guironnet, RTE R&D

Power system state estimation has become one of the critical applications in modern control centers. It not only facilitates real-time security assessment including contingency analysis, load forecasting, on-line power flow, etc. but also enables efficient execution of power markets and related applications. This tutorial intends to provide an overview of the state estimation problem, its formulation and solution. It will cover various related topics such as bad data processing, network observability analysis, topology and parameter error detection as well as the concept of robustness and related performance metrics. This tutorial will also present recent developments in incorporating phasor measurements into the mix of measurements used by state estimators. The tutorial is intended for practicing engineers whose work involves control center applications, for graduate students who wish to have a quick but thorough review of the subject and for developers who maintain and upgrade control center network applications.

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Smart Distribution Systems

Date: Thursday July 21, 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $295, Regular $395; Student Early Bird $100, Student Regular $150
Instructors: Larry Clark, Alabama Power Company; Anil Pahwa, Kansas State University; Georges Simard, S.I.M.A.R.D.SG Inc.; Robert Uluski, UISOL; Sal Martino, EPRI; Ethan Boardman, Alstom GRID; Julio Romero Aguero, Quanta Technology; Grant Gilchrist, Enernex; Terry Saxton, Xtensible Solutions

The concept of Smart Grid involves the complete chain of energy delivery from generation to the customers. Many of the smart grid applications will occur at the distribution level since this is where new communication infrastructure will enable new automation schemes, integration of distributed generation, and integration of customer systems with the operation of the power delivery system. This tutorial covers the most recent evolution of smart distribution applications and technologies involved in the smart distribution system. Important applications include traditional distribution automation functions along with advancements in Volt and Var Control, System Monitoring, Distribution Management Systems and Distributed resource integration. Telecommunication and Standards on Smart Distribution systems will also be part of the tutorial. Topics Include:

  • Smart Distribution Systems Fundamentals
  • Smart Distribution Systems
  • Smart Distribution Circuit Automation
  • Volt/VAR Control
  • Smart Distribution Monitoring
  • Integrated Distribution Management Systems
  • Distributed Energy Resource Integration
  • Smart Communications
  • Smart Distribution Applications Integration
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Half-Day Tutorials

SG 204: Introduction to Smart Grid Data and Analytics

Date: Thursday July 21, 8:00 am-12:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $195, Regular $240; Student Early Bird $50, Student Regular $75
Instructors: Anant Venkateswaran, GE, Ali Ipakchi, OATI

This is an introductory level course to look at smart grid data and analytics, the focus is on the distribution and customer domains of the NIST model. The course covers the following key topics:

  • What data is available from which devices, from the in home controller to meters to relays and substation automation.
  • What applications can be done with the data, with a heavy focus on AMI and line devices.
  • What is the value of each of the applications to the various stakeholders that are associated with the grid, using the Illinois Collaborative definitions of stakeholders.

The course will look at the process of collecting and verifying data, including all of the pitfalls that may occur and provide a 20 step process to go from no data to running analytics. The course is suitable for non-technical, as well as technical audiences, including regulatory, legislative, and utility staff members. The course will also compare and contrast the two major privacy contenders and the impact each would have on the ability to perform the analytic applications based on the principles of each contender. Included in the course will be a summary of the ARRA analytics that have been highlighted by the EPRI and DOE reports.

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Distributed Energy Resources; Operation, Protection and Control

Date: Thursday July 21, 1:00 pm-5:00 pm
Price: Early Bird $195, Regular $240; Student Early Bird $50, Student Regular $75
Instructors: Wayne G. Hartmann, VP, Protection and Smart Grid Solutions

This session provides a background in DER including history, rates, types, standby generation conversion, and operational modes. IEEE 1547 is explored with concentration of the protection at DER, with schemes for inverters and conventional machine based DER covered in depth. Protection and control impacts and solutions for the distribution system are illustrated. Microgrids are addressed as an extension to DER application. Control of DER assets is discussed in light of IEEE 1547A allowing active control of DER VAR output, and how conventional volt/VAR assets and DER assets can be coordinated to cope with variability of the growing renewable portfolio of DER installations.

 

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